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Art History

  • Program Overview

    Art History and Criticism Department

    The Graduate Program in Art History & Criticism at Stony Brook University focuses on modern and contemporary art in its global context, and in relationship with media, technology and material culture. At both the M.A. and Ph.D levels, we offer a dynamic, interdisciplinary curriculum along with individual mentoring from faculty whose work has won national and international recognition. Our proximity to New York City offers extensive opportunities for research, collaboration,and professional networking at world-class museums and galleries, and allows our students to take courses at other schools in the New York Inter-University Doctoral Consortium including Columbia, NYU, CUNY and Princeton. Our students have been successful in securing tenure-track academic positions at universities around the world, and at earning internships, fellowships, curatorial positions, and teaching roles at major New York institutions such as the Whitney Museum, Creative Time, and The Museum of Modern Art.

    Under the visionary leadership of Lawrence Alloway, the Program in Art History & Criticism was one of the first programs in the world to support graduate level study of modern and contemporary art, and we pride ourselves on engaging emerging, interdisciplinary, and comparative methodologies. As a small and selective program in a large, public institution we are able to offer graduate training with low tuition costs, with teaching experience in a highly diverse undergraduate population, and with the full resources of major research university. Students benefit from the Department of Art’s MFA program and from affiliates of Art who teach continental philosophy and aesthetics in the Department of Philosophy, global film studies in the Department of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, sound art and sound studies in Music, and at the intersection of art and science in the Consortium for Digital Arts, Culture and Technology. M.A. and Ph.D students may take advantage of an additional credential through the Advanced Graduate Certificate in Media, Art, Culture, and Technology housed in Art, and through the Advanced Graduate Certificate in Art and Philosophy. Ample opportunities for curatorial theory and practice are available in conjunction with regular exhibitions at the University’s Zuccaire, Alloway, and Simons Center art galleries


     

    Degree Programs

    M.A. in Art History and Criticism

    The M.A. in Art History and Criticism is a two year 36-credit degree program with a strong emphasis on modern and contemporary art and visual and material culture. The program aims to produce scholars, critics and curators who can address artistic production through contemporary issues and paradigms. Media aesthetics, art and technology, globalization, public art and social practice, politics of the avant-garde, and critical curatorial studies are currently active areas of departmental research. The program culminates in the preparation of a written thesis. Part-time study is allowed in this degree program. The M.A. in Art History and Criticism can be considered appropriate preparation for Ph.D. degrees in art history or other fields. Students also move on to careers in arts education, or gallery and museum work.

    Ph.D. in Art History and Criticism

    Stony Brook’s Ph.D. program in art history and criticism is designed to encourage students to apply what they have learned at the master’s level towards more intense and individual research. The emphasis of the program is on integrating historical and theoretical study into a curriculum focused on an interdisciplinary approach to modern and contemporary art and visual and material culture. The program culminates in the oral defense of a substantial written dissertation on an original topic. Students are not accepted into the Ph.D. program on a part-time basis. This degree is considered essential for those intending to engage in advanced academic research, teaching, and publishing in the field of art history and criticism, and may provide a significant advantage to those entering the professional art world of museums and galleries.

    Advanced Graduate Certificate (AGC) in Art and Philosophy (ArtPHIL)

    For information about this advanced certificate program, please go to   http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/philosophy/docs/artscert.html .

    Advanced Graduate Certificate (AGC) in Media, Art, Culture, and Techonology

    The Advanced Graduate Certificate Program in Media, Art, Culture, and Technology (MACT) offers graduate students an interdisciplinary grounding in the historical and theoretical study of media, art, culture, and technology. The MACT graduate certificate is designed to complement a graduate student’s primary degree by supporting research that traverses traditional academic methods and objects of inquiry in the humanities. Combining  faculty with diverse expertise in media, art, culture, and technology, MACT supports work at the dynamic intersections of these evolving fields. Students enrolled in MACT are encouraged to join the  MACT email list and to consult the  MACT website  for ongoing support and information as they move toward completion of the certificate.


     

  • Admissions

    Admission to the M.A. and Ph.D. Programs in Art History and Criticism

    In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, the following information and prerequisites should be noted:

    Admission for full-and part-time study is for the Fall semester. Part-time study is permissible for qualified M.A. candidates only. Admission into the M.A. and Ph.D. programs is at the discretion of the art history and criticism faculty with the final approval of the Graduate School. Admission to the program assumes a minimum of a B average in undergraduate work, meeting the standards of admission to the Graduate School, and taking the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, as required for all applicants to the Graduate School. The minimum TOEFL score for admission is 550 (paper), or 213 (computer), or 90 (internet-based test); OR an IELTS total score of 6.5. In order to teach, any graduate student whose native language is not English must score 55 or above on the TSE or SPEAK test OR obtain a score of 7.0 or better in the speaking component of the IELTS test. The website for ETS (TOEFL & GRE) is www.ets.org.

    It is recognized that M.A. and Ph.D. applicants may come from a wide variety of backgrounds that will require individual structuring of their programs to suit their needs. Applicants will ordinarily have a bachelor’s degree with an art history major or minor; however, this requirement may be waived at the discretion of the graduate faculty. Those without a demonstrated background in art history may be advised to take the two-part undergraduate art history survey, plus at least four upper-division  undergraduate courses in art history (with at least two of those being in art history post 1800), prior to admission to the program. Undergraduate courses will not count toward your graduate degree. All applicants are encouraged to submit a sample of written work with their application.

  • Degree Requirements

    Requirements for the M.A. Degree in Art History and Criticism

    A. Course Requirements
    The student will be required to complete successfully 36 credits of graduate work, as outlined in the list of courses below. A student must achieve a 3.0 overall grade point average to receive a degree from Stony Brook.

    1. Required Courses (6 credits)

    ARH 540 Methodologies of Art History (3 credits)

    ARH 592 Teaching Practicum (3 credits)

    2. Art History and Criticism Electives (15-21 credits)

    ARH 501 Theory and Criticism: From Antiquity through the Renaissance (3 credits)

    ARH 502 History of 19th Century Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 503 History of 20th Century Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 541 Topics in Ancient Art (3 credits)

    ARH 542 Topics in Medieval Art (3 credits)

    ARH 543 Topics in Renaissance Art (3 credits)

    ARH 544 Topics in Early Modern Art (3 credits)

    ARH 545 Topics in 19th-Century Art (3 credits)

    ARH 546 Topics in 20th-Century Art (3 credits)

    ARH 547 Topics in Global, Colonial and Diasporic Art (3 credits)

    ARH 548 Museum Studies Seminar (3 credits)

    ARH 549 Topics in American Visual Culture (3 credits)

    ARH 550 Inquiries into Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 551 Topics in Performance (3 credits)

    ARH 552 Topics in Contemporary Art (3 credits)

    ARH 554 Topics in Visual Culture (3 credits)

    ARH 570 Issues in Architectural History and Criticism (3 credits)

    3. Humanities and Social Sciences Electives (3-9 credits)

    One to three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences, to be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor and with the approval of the M.A./Ph.D. Graduate Director. These may be in relevant aspects of literary studies or criticism, history, musicology, philosophy, dramaturgy, sociology, anthropology, etc., but cannot be in studio art.

    4. Other (0-12 credits)

    ARH 580 Art Criticism or Gallery Internship (0-3 credits)

    ARS 580 Visual Arts seminar or other studio class (0-3 credits)

    ARH 591 Practicum in the Writing of Art Criticism (0-3 credits)

    ARH 595 Directed Readings (0-3 credits)

    ARH 598 Thesis (0-6 credits).

    B. Comprehensive Examination
    This test of basic competency, offered in early September of each academic year, is designed to assess the student’s knowledge of individual artists and works of art, and of particular periods and dates in the history of art. It will include slide identifications and definitions of terms relevant to the history of art and art criticism. Student must take this examination in their third semester of study in order to continue in the program. An extension will be permitted for part-time students.

    C. Foreign Language
    A reading knowledge of French or German must be acquired before graduation. Students planning to advance to doctoral work will be encouraged to master both of these languages.

    D. Teaching Requirement
    All graduate students will be expected to assist in teaching a minimum of one semester, usually during their second year of residency. The course in which the student will assist shall ordinarily be an upper-level undergraduate course, under the supervision of a professor. Competency in teaching will be judged on the basis of a guest lecture, class discussion sessions, and other classroom assignments observed by the course’s faculty supervisor , as well as on the basis of the assistant’s overall performance..

    E. Thesis
    At the beginning of the third semester at the latest, the student, together with the Director of Graduate Studies, will jointly agree on a thesis topic, based upon an paper that s/he has written for a seminar in fall or spring semester of the first year. The student will at that time submit a prospectus outlining the nature and aims of the thesis. Over the course of the third and fourth semesters, in light of recommendations provided by a faculty advisor, this paper will be reworked into a significant original work relevant to art history, criticism, and/or theory. The advisor will be selected by the student at the beginning of the third semester or before that, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. A faculty reader, appointed by the Director of Graduate Studies early in the third semester, will also read the thesis. (The student may request a member of the affiliate faculty as his or her second reader, if said individual is willing to serve. Affiliated faculty may not serve as primary advisor, however.).  The thesis is to be completed and approved by the end of the fourth semester.

     

    Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Art History and Criticism

    A. Course Requirements
    The student will be required to complete successfully 60 credits of graduate work, as outlined in the list of categories and courses below. Credits for the Ph.D. will total 24 beyond the entering Master's degree or its equivalent, as determined by the Director of Graduate Studies, for a total of 60 credits. A student must achieve a 3.0 overall grade point average to receive a degree from Stony Brook.

    Required Courses (6-9 credits)

    ARH 540 Methodologies in Art History (3 credits)

    ARH 602 Practicum in Teaching (3-6 credits)

    2. Electives in Art History, Visual Culture, and Criticism (24-36 credits)

    ARH 501 Criticism, Theory, Practice: From Artes Mechanicae to Artes Liberales (3 credits)

    ARH 502 History of l9th Century Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 503 History of 20th Century Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 541 Topics in Ancient Art (3 credits)

    ARH 542 Topics in Medieval Art (3 credits)

    ARH 543 Topics in Renaissance Art (3 credits)

    ARH 544 Topics in Early Modern Art (3 credits)

    ARH 545 Topics in 19th Century Art (3 credits)

    ARH 546 Topics in 20th Century Art (3 credits)

    ARH 547 Topics in Global, Colonial and Diasporic Art (3 credits)

    ARH 548 Museum Studies (3 credits)

    ARH 549 Topics in American Visual Culture (3 credits)

    ARH 550 Inquiry in Art Criticism and Theory (3 credits)

    ARH 551 Topics in Performance (3 credits)

    ARH 552 Topics in Contemporary Art (3 credits)

    ARH 553 Contemporary Art in New York (3 credits)

    ARH 554 Topics in Visual Culture (3 credits)

    ARH 570 Issues in Architectural History and Criticism (3 credits)

    3. Humanities and Social Science Electives (6-12 credits)

    4. Other electives

    ARH 580 Art Criticism of Gallery Internship (0-3 credits)

    ARS 580 Visual Arts Seminar (0-3 credits)

    ARH 598 MA thesis (0-6 credits)

    ARH 591 Practicum in the Writing of Art Criticism (0-3 credits)

    ARH 690 Directed Readings (0-6 credits)

    5. PhD Thesis Credits (after being advanced to doctoral candidacy and G5 status)

    ARH 699 Dissertation Research on Campus

    ARH 700 Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

    ARH 701 Dissertation Research off Campus - International

    Credits for thesis preparation and research may be used to complete the total of 60 credits for the Ph.D.

    B. Teaching Requirement
    All doctoral students will be expected to assist in teaching a minimum of one year regardless of previous experience. Students without Teaching Assistantships will either teach stand-alone sections of the introductory undergraduate courses in the history of art; or assist in upper-division (300 level) undergraduate courses, taught by a supervising faculty member. During their first and third years of study, students with Teaching Assistantships will assist in upper-division (300 level) undergraduate courses, taught by the supervising faculty member. During the student with Teaching Assistantship’s second and fourth year (if supported), s/he will teach a stand-alone section of the introductory undergraduate course in the history of art. Some may also assist in or teach an undergraduate course at the 300 level. Competence in teaching will be judged through teacher evaluation questionnaires, by classroom or lecture hall visits by the course's faculty supervisor, and by faculty supervisor assessments of the Teaching Assistant's overall performance.

    C. Comprehensive Examination
    Information about the required comprehensive examination is found above under degree requirements for the M.A. Degree in Art History and Criticism. All Ph.D. students who enter the program without a master’s degree in art history must take this examination before the end of the third semester of study in order to continue in the program. Ph.D. students who enter the program with an M.A. degree in art history will be exempted from taking the comprehensive examination.

    D. M.A. Thesis
    At the beginning of the third semester at the latest, the student, together with the Director of Graduate Studies, will jointly agree on a thesis topic, based upon an paper that s/he has written for a seminar in fall or spring semester of the first year. The student will at that time submit a prospectus outlining the nature and aims of the thesis. Over the course of the third and fourth semesters, in light of recommendations provided by a faculty advisor, this paper will be reworked into a significant original work relevant to art history, criticism, and/or theory. The advisor will be selected by the student at the beginning of the third semester or before that, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. A faculty reader, appointed by the Director of Graduate Studies early in the third semester, will also read the thesis. (The student may request a member of the affiliate faculty as his or her second reader, if said individual is willing to serve. Affiliated faculty may not serve as primary advisor, however.) The thesis is to be completed and approved by the end of the fourth semester.

    E. Foreign Language Requirement
    A reading knowledge of German and French is required for advancement to candidacy. In consultation with the candidate’s advisor, the student may petition the Director of Graduate Studies to replace one of these two languages with a different language more suitable for the student’s projected area of research. Mastery of a third language may also be recommended if it is deemed necessary for the student’s research.

    F. Qualifying (Preliminary) Examination
    The Qualifying Examination will be administered on or about March 1st of each year to PhD students in their third year of coursework (second year for those entering with a prior master’s degree), prior to the beginning of dissertation research. It will be a written exam covering a major and minor.

    The content of the exam will vary according to the student’s interests and their choice of major and minor fields, but exam preparation should ideally begin during the student’s second year of coursework. The student will be expected to select two faculty members to serve as major and minor advisors, and to seek guidance from them on appropriate focus and bibliography in preparation for the exams. The Qualifying Exam committee consists of three members of the department faculty (including major and minor advisors), and is appointed upon the recommendation of the M.A./Ph.D. Graduate Director, in consultation with the student. The format of the exam will be five questions for the major, from which the student shall choose three; and three questions for the minor, from which the student shall choose two to answer. Responses are in essay form.

    G. Advancement to Candidacy
    To be advanced to Ph.D. candidacy, the student must have:

    1. Completed at least 54 graduate credits and all other degree requirements (see A-F listed above), other than the dissertation and dissertation research credits.

    2. Submitted and defended a proposal outlining the nature and aims of the dissertation. The proposal must be approved by a faculty dissertation committee and by the Director of Graduate Studies (see below). When all of these requirements have been completed satisfactorily, the Director of Graduate Studies will submit a request to the Dean of the Graduate School to advance the candidate to candidacy.

    H. Dissertation
    No later than eight weeks before the beginning of the seventh semester, (fifth semester for those entering with a prior master’s degree), but preferably by the end of the sixth semester, the student will prepare a written prospectus, outlining the scope, method, and aims of the dissertation. The student will submit the proposal to the dissertation advisor and two other members of the faculty who will serve as readers, as members of the departmental dissertation committee; one of those readers (but not the advisor), a member of the art history faculty, will serve as Chair of the dissertation defense. After the student’s advisor has conferred with the other departmental committee members and the departmental committee has approved the proposal, the advisor will submit the proposal and names of the committee members to the Director of Graduate Studies for approval. (The student may be advanced to candidacy at this point.) The student will then give a digital and hard copy of the proposal and the approval sheet to the Graduate Coordinator. At least six months before the dissertation defense, the Graduate Studies Director, in consultation with student and the student’s dissertation committee, will name a reader from outside the department who has specialized in related areas. The Graduate Director must then request approval of the Dissertation Examining Committee by the Graduate School.

    At least ten to twelve weeks before the Graduate School’s deadline for submitting the completed dissertation, the student will submit to the Dissertation Examining Committee  what is intended to be the final draft of the dissertation. No more than four weeks after that, if the readers have agreed that the dissertation is ready to be defended, the dissertation committee chairperson will schedule the defense, an oral examination open to interested faculty and graduate students. The date of the defense must be approved by the Graduate School. All four readers on the dissertation committee must recommend acceptance of the dissertation before it can be approved by the Graduate School. 

    I. Time Limit
    All requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be completed within seven years after completing 24 hours of graduate courses in the department. In rare instances, the dean of the Graduate School will entertain a petition to extend this time limit, provided it bears the endorsement of the department chairperson.

    Requirements for the Advanced Graduate Certificate (AGC) in Media, Art, Culture, and Technology

    15- Credit Requirement: The Certificate is awarded upon completion of five MACT-eligible courses, or fifteen-credits, which may also be counted toward degree requirements in the student’s home department.  Eligible courses must use humanistic methods of critical inquiry to engage topics at the intersection of media, art, technology, and culture. Any instructor may submit a syllabus to the Director to request that his or her course be considered eligible for credit toward the MACT certificate; eligibility is approved by the MACT executive committee. *A maximum of six credits (two courses) taken prior to enrolling in MACT can be credited toward the completion of the certificate.*

    Interdisciplinary Requirement: Students may count a maximum of three courses listed within their home department/program toward the graduate certificate; at least two of the five courses counted for credit in MACT must be listed outside the graduate student’s home department or program. Also, at least three different departments or programs must be represented among the five courses that are counted for credit toward the MACT certificate. (Cross-listed courses can be counted for any one of the departments/programs designated).

    Curriculum: To be eligible for credit toward the certificate, a course 1) must be taught in a CAS department or program, 2) must engage in critical inquiry through the lens of the arts and humanities (for example, courses in the practice of physical science would be precluded), 3) must significantly address intersections of media, art, culture, and technology, 4) must be open to enrollment by students outside the listing department/program, 5) cannot be a required course for a departmental degree. Courses are approved as eligible by the MACT executive committee. Any faculty member may request a course be listed as MACT eligible by submitting a syllabus and written request no later than one month before enrollment opens for the term. More information, and an archive of MACT-eligible courses with titles, instructors, and descriptions is maintained on the MACT website:  http://mact.stonybrook.edu/

    MACT relies largely on "topics" courses that affiliate faculty offer on changing subjects close to their current research. Therefore, a list of eligible courses is updated each term. Courses may have their own pre-requisites, and are open to MACT students by permission of the instructor.

    Eligible Courses:

    Fall 2016 : ARH 541, ARH 549, ARH 552, (CLT/CST 609 Tan), MUS 555

    Spring 2016: ARH 546, ARH 549, ARH 552, ARH 550, EGL 555, MUS 536, MUS 555, WRT 617

    Fall 2015: ARH 549, ARH 551,MUS 536

    Spring 2015: ARH 546, ARH 552, EGL 608, CLT/CST 609 (August), CLT/CST 609 (Gaboury), MUS 541, MUS 555

     

  • Facilities

    Facilities of Art History and Criticism Department

    Since 1976, the Department of Art has enjoyed the resources of the Staller Center for the Arts. This 226,026-square-foot building includes the Departments of Art, Music, and Theatre and is a vibrant hub of lectures, concerts, performances, and other cultural activities. The complex includes faculty and staff offices, art history classrooms, and a graduate lounge. The first floor of the Art wing features a magnificent art gallery space devoted primarily to exhibitions of contemporary art. In addition, the department has substantial graduate studio space available at other locations on campus. Studio facilities in the Staller Center include full foundry, metals, and wood shops; a ceramics and ceramic sculpture studio; spacious painting, drawing, and studio classrooms; printmaking studios with etching, stone lithography and photo plate making and screen printing facilities; extensive digital facilities; and a shooting studio with gang and individual darkrooms. Art history classrooms are equipped with slide projectors and data projectors. The main library houses extensive collections of scholarship on the arts, including recent exhibition catalogues and the most important art history and criticism journals. Proximity to New York City makes available the numerous libraries, museums, galleries, ateliers, and publishing institutions of the greater metropolitan area. Classes, lectures, and conferences are also now offered at Stony Brook’s Manhattan facility, conveniently located at 28th Street and Park Avenue South, and easy to reach by bus, train, and subway. Finally, the Pollock-Krasner House and the Pollock-Krasner Study Center, in East Hampton and Southampton, Long Island, are affiliated with the University. Once the home and studio of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner, the Pollock-Krasner House is now a both a landmark museum and a forum for lectures, seminars, and other academic activities. The Study Center comprises extensive reference materials and archives, including books, photographs, oral histories, and journals available for research.

  • Faculty

    Faculty of Art History and Criticism

    Professors

    Bogart, Michele H., Ph.D., 1979, University of Chicago: American Art and Visual Culture.

    Lutterbie, John, Ph.D., 1983, University of Washington: Performance and Theatre Studies.

    Rubin, James H., Ph.D., 1972, Harvard University: 18th- and 19th-century Art; Art and Politics.

    Siegel, Katy, Ph.D., 1995, University of Texas at Austin: Art Criticism, Postwar and Contemporary Art, Curatorial Studies.

    Associate Professors

    Frank, Barbara E., Ph.D., 1988, Indiana University: African, Mesoamerican and African Diaspora art history.

    Patterson, Zabet, Ph.D., 2007, University of California, Berkeley: Core Faculty for the Consortium for Digital Arts, Culture, and Technology; Contemporary European and American Art & Criticism; History & Theory of Computational Media, Performance & Cybernetics.

    Uroskie, Andrew V., Ph.D., 2005, University of California, Berkeley: History And Criticism of Late Modernism, Experimental Film, Video and Performance.

    Assistant Professors

    Belisle, Brooke, Ph.D., 2012, University of California, Berkeley: Core Faculty for the Consortium for Digital Arts, Culture, and Technology; Visual Culture, Media Art, Comparative History and Theory Of Photography, Cinema, and Digital Media.

    Gaboury, Jacob, PhD, 2014, New York University: History and Theory of Digital Media, Visual Culture, Queer Theory, and Media Studies.

    Lee, Sohl, Ph.D., 2014, University of Rochester: Contemporary East Asian Art and Visual Culture, Critical Theory and Globalization.

    Mather, David S., Ph.D., 2012, University of California, San Diego: Early Twentieth-Century and Interwar European Art.

    Lecturers

    Goodarzi, Shoki, Lecturer. Ph.D., 1999, University of California at Berkeley: Contemporary Middle Eastern Art & Cinema; Near Eastern Art & Archaeology; Greek & Roman Art and Archaeology; Curatorial Studies.

    Arts Administration

    Harrison, Helen, Director of the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center.

    Levitov, Karen, Director and Curator, Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery, Staller Center for the Arts.

    Walsh, Lorraine, Art Director and Curator of The Simons Center for Geometry and Physics.

    Affiliated Faculty

    Craig, Megan, Assistant Professor of Philosophy. Ph.D., 2006, New School: Levinas and aesthetics; phenomenology; painting.

    Kaplan, Elizabeth Ann, Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies; Director, Humanities Institute at Stony Brook. Ph.D., 1970, Rutgers University: Film and cultural studies; women's studies; psychoanalysis.

    Munich, Adrienne, Professor of English. Ph.D., 1976, City University of New York: Victorian literature and culture; feminist theory; material culture; fashion theory.

    See STUDIO ART FACULTY: http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/gradbulletin/current/academicprograms/ars/faculty.php


     

    Number of teaching, graduate, and research assistants, Fall 2013: 20

  • Contact

    Art History and Criticism

    Chairperson
    Barbara Frank, Staller Center 4219 (631) 632-7250

    M.A./Ph.D. Graduate Program Director
    Shoki Goodarzi, shoki.goodarzi@stonybrook.edu

    Advanced Certificate Graduate Director

    Brooke Belisle, brooke.belisle@stonybrook.edu

    Graduate Secretary
    Lisa Perez, Staller Center 2228 (631) 632-7270

    Degrees Awarded
    M.A. in Art History and Criticism; Ph.D. in Art History and Criticism; Certificate in Media, Art, Culture, & Technology

    Website
    http://art.stonybrook.edu; http://mact.stonybrook.edu

    Application
    https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantLogin.asp?id=sunysb-gs

     

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